a taste of Saint-Malo

As a little girl, France meant 1 thing: Paris. Outside of glowing images of the Eiffel Tower, bustling bistros and baguette, I’ll admit I knew very little. My horizons were broadened once I began studying French in school and even more so when I spent a semester at the Sorbonne. But only since packing my bags and moving back here after graduation have I truly been able to look beyond the city of lights to the other regions of metropolitan France, each of which boasts a unique character – a “claim to fame,” so to speak.

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a taste of Provence

They say the Provence region of France is blessed by the gods. I’m inclined to agree.

With sun-soaked hillside villages overlooking sweeping lavender fields, olive groves and vineyards, “charming” is certainly an understatement. In fact, I think “enchanting” is more appropriate.

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a taste of La Rochelle and Ile de Ré

When it comes to coastal cities in France, La Rochelle is a must-see. Commonly referred to as “La Ville Blanche” due to its characteristic limestone facades, this port city sits in the Poitou Charentes region of southwest France, a short 2-hour drive from Bordeaux.

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a taste of London

Remember when I traveled to Annecy and Lyon and, doing as the French do, gorged myself on regional specialities that were often meat-heavy and always cheesy?

Well, London was a very different experience.

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a taste of Paris, featuring sustainable urban farming

When I think of Paris, I imagine cast-iron balustrades bordering the Métropolitan signs of the subways stations, wrought iron balconies, elegant cream-colored stonework and wide boulevards lined with independent bookshops, cafés and boulangeries.

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a taste of Lyon

Picture this: someone blows up a pig intestine like a balloon until it takes the shape of a sausage casing. Then he/she stuffs said casing with more chopped up (and very well rinsed) intestines before tying up both ends with string, cooking it, slathering on some mustard sauce and calling it andouillette.

Now picture this: Jacqueline (me) doesn’t know what andouillette is but thinks – what the hec I’m gonna be adventurous YOLO, am I right? – and decides to order it. And eat it. And subsequently google it because, you know, it didn’t taste exactly like normal sausage. In fact, it was oddly pink and chewy.

SURPRISE! Never thought you would have intestines in your intestines, did you? Well, there’s a first time for everything.

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a taste of Annecy (and traveling alone)

I’ll get to the oh-so-delicious food I ate in Annecy in a sec (and if you’re here just for that, feel free to scroll down). But first, allow me a moment of non-food commentary. Because I just traveled solo for the first time, and it’s worth a paragraph or two, don’t you think?

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